The Importance of Mother’s Day

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Abby Richards

Staff Writer

Mother’s Day is coming up Sunday, May 12, a time when the children of America thank their mothers for all they have done for them day in and day out.

Celebrating mothers goes all the way back to the ancient Greeks and Romans who used to have festivals that would honor the mother goddesses Rhea and Cybele (History.com Editors). “Mothering Sunday” was then established, a Christian holiday in which those who were faithful would go to their “mother church”, or main church in their home for a particularly special service. The roots of Mother’s Day don’t just stem from beliefs or religion though. A woman named Ann Reeves Jarvis helped start the “Mothers’ Day Work Clubs” in the 19th century and Julia Ward Howe wrote the “Mother’s Day Proclamation” in order to ask mother’s to promote world peace (she wrote this in 1870, after the Civil War). After Jarvis passed her daughter made the final push for Mother’s Day which, as a result of her and her mother’s efforts, would become an official holiday in the early 1900s.

Pictured here is Ann Reeves Jarvis, one of the many women responsible for making Mother’s Day an official holiday.   

A few students at Foran have opinions on what Mother’s Day truly means to them as well as different traditions on this day. While any tradition is greatly appreciated by mothers on Mother’s Day this day means something special to their sons and daughters too. Luke Alfano and Alex Mingrone see it as a time to thank their mothers for what they have done over the past year and throughout their lives. Meghan Stokes views this day as a time for all mothers to understand how important they are to their family and, as Jesse Foss says, “…to celebrate all of the hard work it takes to be an amazing mom.”

Everyone has a different tradition on Mother’s Day. For one, Mingrone goes to his grandparent’s house and has lunch with his entire family. Stokes explains, “My tradition on Mother’s Day is allowing my mom to know she is appreciated and loved. Our family usually plans out something, but in recent years we ask our mom what her perfect day is and how to spend it.” Foss has a little different tradition saying how she is usually at a dance competition with her mom on Mother’s Day.

Mother’s Day became a holiday four years after the nation’s first Father’s Day on June 19, 1910. There are many opinions on whether or not there should be more emphasis placed on Mother’s Day. Foss feels that there should be more emphasis because mothers work so hard. Even so, Stokes notes how society is changing saying, “…previously it was just a day that people said the phrase “Happy Mother’s Day” and did nothing to celebrate it. With society changing and bringing out the true meaning of holidays [it] brings the importance back to them.” On the other hand, Alfano says there should not be more emphasis placed on this day as he feels “it is much more commercialized then Father’s Day.” Mingrone agrees saying “I think there is enough emphasis on Mother’s Day.” Even so, he emphasizes the equality between these two days. “It feels about as emphasized as Father’s Day, which is only right.”